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Is Servicing Usually Included in PCP Car Finance?

When you finance a car, are servicing, maintenance, and repairs included in the package? 🤔 If you’re asking this question then this article is definitely for you. Let’s discover whether PCP finance car servicing is available for your car, or if you can finance a car with repairs included. What options you have when it comes to making sure that your vehicle is well-maintained?

Do I Have to Pay for PCP Car Servicing?

With Personal Contract Purchase and Hire Purchase car finance deals, you have to be the one to spend on car servicing and maintenance because these are not included with this type of car financing. So you need to consider "can I finance car repairs"? Make sure that you have set aside an ample budget for the cost of getting your car serviced, and of course for all the other peripheral costs of running a car! So, in addition to the monthly repayment amount and other car-related expenses like insurance, tax, and fuel, make sure you have enough funds for servicing, maintenance, and repairs.  

With a PCP the monthly repayments are calculated to cover only the cost of the depreciation of the car and the balloon payments at the end covers the final estimated value of the car at that time. 

With a Personal Contract Hire agreement, however, servicing and maintenance costs can be covered by the car finance company. PCH is also known as car leasing and it works in the same way as a car rental but for long-term contracts. Every month, you’d have to pay a certain amount and when your agreement comes to an end, you have to hand back the car to the car finance company. 

Typically, drivers can get PCH agreements for two to four years. Most deals require a deposit, just like PCP and HP car finance. It is then followed by monthly payments until the end of the contract. After that, you simply have to return the vehicle and not pay anything else. Of course, you need to follow and stick to the pre-agreed mileage limit and also keep the car well-cared for. Any damage beyond the usual wear and tear would mean penalty charges that you’d have to pay. 

Do I Need to Service My Car on PCP?

All cars need regular servicing for them to work properly and to ensure safe driving. For many diesel and petrol vehicles, they usually start having issues when they are not taken to the garage for routine servicing. As for newer models, the common problems are that they can be more prone to clogged filters and more sensitive when low-quality oil is used in them. 

Apart from keeping the car in top condition, a complete service history also influences the resale value of a vehicle. For example, a car could lose up to 12% of its value if it doesn’t have a history of maintenance and servicing. So, whether you bought the car with cash or you financed it through a Hire Purchase or Personal Contract Purchase agreement, it’s still important to have the car serviced regularly. When the time comes when you take ownership of the vehicle and you choose to sell it, you want to be able to do so at a good price. 

But what if you don’t intend to buy the car at the end of a PCP deal? Do you still need to service the car? Yes, definitely. With a PCP agreement, it is normally stated in your contract that you have to take the car for regular servicing, otherwise, you’d have to face certain penalty charges from the lender. You still need to take care of the vehicle even if you don’t want to own it at the end of your PCP contract. 

Where Can I Get My Car Serviced?

You’re actually free to choose where to have your car serviced according to a law that was passed in October 2003. Prior to that date, car manufacturers had a say on which garage to use to have car servicing while the vehicle is still within the term of their warranty. It was only after the warranty period was over that drivers could choose their preferred garage. 

Now that we have a law that makes us free to select the garage we want for car servicing, it’s much easier to shop around and find the best one that fits our preferences. Do note however that the services performed on the vehicle should still abide by the car manufacturer’s schedule. If any parts need to be replaced, they must also be approved by the manufacturer. As the driver of the vehicle, be sure to keep the car servicing records, including the service history and invoices that itemised any work that has been carried out. 

How to Find a Good Garage for Servicing?

It’s fairly simple to find a reputable garage where you can take your car for servicing. One of the easiest ways to do this is to ask friends and family for recommendations. You can be sure that you can trust their opinion because these are people you know. Apart from this, you can also do a quick online search using your smartphone. Try searching for the “best garage for servicing near me” and you’ll be given hundreds and thousands of results instantly. 

When looking for a good garage, check the websites for the services they offer. You might also want to visit review websites so you can read testimonials from previous customers. Once you have a shortlist, get a quote so you’ll have an idea of the servicing costs. The quote should include VAT, labour, and parts. If there’s a need to replace parts, ensure that the garage only uses approved parts so as not to invalidate your car’s warranty. 

Finally, at the end of servicing, you should get a receipt or invoice detailing all the work that has been done and any parts that have been used. Your service book should also get a stamp on it. These will come in handy when you need proof that you’ve taken good care of the car. 

Takeaway

When it comes to servicing a car on PCP finance, we now know that it is something you’d have to prepare for financially since it’s not included in the package deal. Consider the cost of car servicing before you get a car on finance so that you’ll be ready when it’s time for the vehicle to get serviced. This way, you’ll have the budget you need to keep the car well-maintained.

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